Pray for South Sudanese Refugees

On 21 May 2017 people of faith gathered worldwide for the Global Day of Prayer to End Famine, and we continue to pray.

This week, we pray for the thousands of South Sudanese refugees seeking refuge in Ugandan settlements.

General photos of Imvepi Refugee Camp where alongside food distributions, World Vision assesses around 200 vulnerable children per day at a tent in the Imvepi refugee reception center. Unaccompanied minors, children separated from their families and children at risk are given individualised care, psychological first aid and support to ensure they are protected and safe from further harm. Many have trekked for days, even weeks through bush in searing temperatures subjected to sexual and physical exploitation, arriving in Uganda traumatised, with no belongings, hungry and in need of urgent care

Uganda has been receiving more than 2,000 refugees from South Sudan daily, with women and children accounting for 86% of this number, according to international refugee body UNHCR.

At the end of 2015, Uganda hosted more than 500,000 refugees and asylum seekers, making it the third-largest refugee-hosting country in Africa after Ethiopia and Kenya. Ugandan law automatically grants refugee status to South Sudanese, which entitles them to the same social services as nationals, the right to work, education, freedom of movement, and access to land for home and farming.

According to Gilbert Kamanga, World Vision Uganda country director, “Children make up the highest percentage of new arrivals and they bear the brunt of the conflict in South Sudan. This ongoing influx has caused huge needs in the areas of child protection, psychosocial support, education, social cohesion and youth development programming.”

General photos of Imvepi Refugee Camp where alongside food distributions, World Vision assesses around 200 vulnerable children per day at a tent in the Imvepi refugee reception center. Unaccompanied minors, children separated from their families and children at risk are given individualised care, psychological first aid and support to ensure they are protected and safe from further harm. Many have trekked for days, even weeks through bush in searing temperatures subjected to sexual and physical exploitation, arriving in Uganda traumatised, with no belongings, hungry and in need of urgent care

World Vision also reports that some 9,000 unaccompanied minors and separated children from South Sudan have crossed into Uganda since July 2016.

“Every day, World Vision is registering more than 100 separated and unaccompanied minors at Imvepi refugee settlement. The majority of these children saw their parents being killed while others lost touch with their families once fighting broke out. Some of them walk for more than a week to get to Uganda, with nothing to eat. This is one of the worst forms of violence against children. It must stop. Peace needs to prevail in South Sudan,” urges Kamanga.

The humanitarian response in Uganda continues to face significant challenges in light of chronic and severe underfunding. In 2016, the humanitarian response for South Sudanese refugees in Uganda received just 40 percent of the $251 million requested, compromising the abilities of the response to provide vital aid.


Psalm 68:5: “A father to orphans and an advocate for widows is God in his holy dwelling place.

Dear Merciful Father. You are a father to the fatherless, and comforter to those in distress. We ask for protection over your little ones who are fleeing conflict, and healing for those who have witnessed terrible displays of violence and drought. Please move the hearts of this world to advocate and respond in time to provide the vital aid necessary for healthy and bright futures.

 

now what?

Learn more about the Hunger Crisis in East Africa and ways you can make a difference.

Join HungerFree

Array

pic2
hungerfree
X